Renoise supports Sound Design course at the University of California

Traditional horizontal sequencers are widely used for educational purposes, but how well do trackers fare on schools and universities nowadays? In any case, it would be interesting to see how students respond to working with Renoise. Recently we sponsored several copies of Renoise for use in a Digital Video & Sound Design course at the University of California, Los Angeles.
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BeatBattle 5 Underwater

On May 1, BeatBattle 5 launched together with our website's rejuvenation and the introduction of an all new magazine section. The theme could not have been more appropriate to accompany the immersive articles.

BeatBattle 5's theme is: Underwater!

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Record dry, monitor wet

In this tutorial I will show you how the 'External Audio Recording & Line-in Device' can be used to monitor a wet signal while recording a dry input. For an overview or more general usage, check the Renoise Tutorials article on the External Audio Recoring and Line-in Device.

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BeatBattle 5 starts May 1st

Cancel your next month's appointments! BeatBattle 5 starts on May 1st.

New rules

Renoise songs with vocals and live instruments are few and far between. That makes us a bit sad. We allow you to use VSTs and the External Audio Recorder, one of Renoise 1.8's main new features. Mind you, we will only accept stand-alone XRNS files. VSTs must be rendered down.

Theme

You have one month to create a song that fits the given theme. We will announce the theme when the compo starts, on May 1st.

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Making Magic Delay And Verb

A while back I was interested in finding more realistic dub twang-delay sounds in VST form, which was discussed in this thread. As far as I am aware, the authentic spring-twang sound is currently impossible to re-create in software, as it relies on having a real spring and something to twang that spring - imagine trying to emulate those physics with maths!

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Ghost Notes uncovered

If you have ever watched a horror movie, you know how sound effects can make you jump you out of your seat. Those sound effects would make for a nice article. Ghost Notes however, are an entirely different subject.

What are Ghost Notes?

The Ghost Notes technique allows you to glide effects from one note to subsequent notes. On synthesizers the same effect is usually achieved with an LFO in combination with the Legato mode.

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Renoise and Conserving CPU on Old Machines

For about a year, I was limited to using Renoise on a measly Fujitsu Lifebook Series B circa 2000. In other words, a notebook designed for pure business use (think Microsoft Office only); an 8MB video card, 256MB of RAM under Windows 2000 powered by a 700Mhz Pentium III processor. If you look at the official 'required' specs for Renoise, you'd see that I fall short of this. However, I was able to make music without much restriction. But first, you must let go of everything you know...

Minimize VSTIs

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Crippled chords without a Full N-Key Rollover

Identifying the problem

What do writers, gamers and trackers have in common? You type so fast that you hold the keys before they appear on screen. The word "the" is so common, you simply press all three keys are pressed at once. But what happens with lenghtier words? BEEP! Or imagine, your rocket launcher refuses to fire because you are doing a diagonal doublejump in a First Person Shooter. It could mean the end of your virtual life.
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Using Filters Part 2 - Shaping Sonics

This article goes deep into the usage of the Filter2 effect for shaping and controlling the sonics of your song mix. It doesn't matter which genre of music you compose in, as these concepts are transferable. Before we go into detail, please look at Beatslaughterer's article on the explanation of filters; I'll be assuming the readers understanding of some basic terminology as we move through the concepts.

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Sample compression in XRNS files

Songs take less space in Renoise 1.8 than they would have in 1.5 and before. That is because the samples inside the songs are being compressed. Renoise uses lossless compression: once decompressed, the original samples are restored without any loss of quality. One of Renoise 1.8's best kept secrets may be the possibility to manually replace lossless samples with smaller, lossy ones. Lossy compression allows you to bring an 35 MB song back to 2 MB without degrading sound quality too much.
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